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Report of the group of independent experts on accountability 
Date : March 15, 2017
p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 6.0px 0.0px; line-height: 12.0px; font: 12.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #000000; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 12.0px; font: 12.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #000000; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} span.Apple-tab-span {white-space:pre} A/HRC/34/66/Add.1 Report of the group of independent experts on accountability Human Rights CouncilThirty-fourth session27 February-24 March 2017Agenda item 4Human rights situations that require the Council’s attention Report of the group of independent experts on accountability Note by the Secretariat p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 12.0px; font: 12.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #000000; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 12.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #000000; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 18.0px 0.0px; line-height: 12.0px; font: 10.0px 'Times New Roman'; color: #000000; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000} p.p4 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 18.0px 56.7px; text-indent: -56.7px; line-height: 15.0px; font: 14.0px …
Report of the SR on the situation of human rights in the DPRK 
Date : March 15, 2017
p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 11.0px Helvetica; color: #000000; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 11.0px Helvetica; color: #000000; -webkit-text-stroke: #000000; min-height: 13.0px} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea A/HRC/34/66Human Rights CouncilThirty-fourth session27 February-24 March 2017Agenda item 4Human rights situations that require the Council’s attention Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea Note by the Secretariat The present report, submitted to the Human Rights Council pursuant to Council resolution 28/22, is the first to be submitted by the current mandate holder since his appointment in August 2016.  During the reporting period, two nuclear tests and repeated missile launches by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea deepened its international isolation. At the same time, the country took some positive steps to engage with some United Nations human rights mechanisms. p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0…
USCIRF 2016 Annual Report on Freedom of Religion 
Date : August 12, 2016
UNITED STATES COMMISSION ON INTERNATIONAL RELIGIOUS FREEDOM2016 ANNUAL REPORTIn North Korea, thousands of religious believers and their families are imprisoned in labor camps, including those forcibly repatriated from China. Because North Korea is such a closed society, it is hard even to know the names of religious prisoners. The government controls all political and religious expression and activities and punishes those who question the regime. Religious freedom is non-existent. Individuals secretly engaging in religious activities are subject to arrest, torture, imprisonment, and execution. North Koreans suspected of contacts with South Koreans or foreign missionaries or who are caught possessing Bibles have been executed. 
HRNK-Gulag, Inc.: The Use of Forced Labor in NK's Export Industries 
Date : May 27, 2016
Gulag, Inc.: The Use of Forced Labor in North Korea's Export IndustriesKim Kwang-jin, HRNK Non-Resident FellowMay 26, 2016Coal, iron ore, copper, and other commodities constituting the bulk of North Korea’s exports are mined using forced and slave labor, according to a new 50-page report by the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK). Authored by Kim Kwang-jin, North Korean escapee and senior analyst currently residing in South Korea, Gulag, Inc.: The Use of Forced Labor in North Korea’s Export Industries is an examination of North Korea’s forced and slave labor practices, highlighting North Korea’s extractive industry. 
HRW World Report 0216: North Korea 
Date : January 28, 2016
North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is an authoritarian state with a dynastic leadership that is among the most repressive in the world. In 2015, his fourth year in power, leader Kim Jong-Un continued to intensify repression, increased control over the North Korean border with China to prevent North Koreans from escaping and seeking refuge overseas, and tightened restrictions on freedom of movement inside the country. The government also punished those found with unauthorized information from outside the country—including news, films, and photos—and used public executions to generate fearful obedience.
USCIRF’s 2015 Annual Report on NK 
Date : December 21, 2015
The North Korea Chapter in USCIRF’s 2015 Annual Report Key FindingsNorth Korea remains one of the most oppressive regimes in the world and among the worst violators of human rights. The government tightly controls all political and religious expression and activities, and it punishes those who question the regime. Genuine freedom of religion or belief is non-existent. Individuals secretly engaging in religious activities are subject to arrest, torture, imprisonment, and sometimes execution.
DRL, US - Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2014 
Date : June 26, 2015
Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2014 Democratic People's Republic of KoreaEXECUTIVE SUMMARYShare        The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK or North Korea) is an authoritarian state led by the Kim family for more than 60 years. In late 2011 Kim Jong Un was named marshal of the DPRK and supreme commander of the Korean People’s Army. Kim Jong Un’s grandfather, the late Kim Il Sung, remains “eternal president.” The most recent national elections, held in March, were neither free nor fair. Authorities maintained effective control over the security forces.Citizens did not have the ability to change their government. The government subjected citizens to rigid controls over many aspects of their lives, including denial of the freedoms of speech, press, assembly, association, religion, movement, and worker rights. Reports continued of a vast network of political prison camps in which conditions were often harsh, life threatening, and included forced and compulsory labor.Defectors continued to report extrajudicial killings, disappearances, arbitrary detention, arrests of political prisoners, and torture. The judiciary was not…
UN: The State of Food Insecurity in the World (SOFI) Report 2015 
Date : June 1, 2015
UN's FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations) and WFP (World Food Programme) published 'The State of Food Insecurity in the World (SOFI) 2015'.According to the report, approximately 41.6% of North Koreans are suffering from undernourishment. From 2014 to 2016, the number of undernourished North Koreans are 10.5 millions. The proportion of undernourished people is higher than any other countries that the report covered (39 Asian countries).Compared to 2012-14, the number of the undernourished has increased from 10.3 to 10.5 million. The number of the undernourished has increased dramatically since 1990, when the figure was just 4.8 million. 
Report of the SR on the situation of human rights in NK 
Date : April 14, 2015
Human Rights CouncilTwenty-eighth sessionAgenda item 4Human rights situations that require the Council’s attentionReport of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Marzuki DarusmanSummaryIn the present report, submitted pursuant to Human Rights Council resolution 25/25, the Special Rapporteur reflects on the latest developments in relation to the situation in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea over the past year. While initially the authorities of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea made a number of welcome gestures towards increased cooperation with the United Nations human rights system and bilateral partners, those openings have not been sustained, nor borne fruit.The main focus of the report is the development of a multitrack strategy aimed at addressing the issue of international abductions, enforced disappearances and related matters, as recommended by the commission of inquiry on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. By means of such a strategy, the Special Rapporteur seeks to maintain momentum on, and the visibility of, the issue in the international arena, …
Special Rapporteur's 2014 Report on Situation of human rights in NK 
Date : December 2, 2014
Situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea24 October 2014Note by the Secretary-GeneralThe Secretary-General has the honour to transmit to the General Assembly thereport of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the DemocraticPeople’s Republic of Korea, Marzuki Darusman, in accordance with Assemblyresolution 68/183.
US, International Religious Freedom Report for 2013 
Date : August 1, 2014
International Religious Freedom Report for 2013Korea, Democratic People's Republic ofUS Department of StateAlthough the constitution and other laws and policies provide for religious freedom, in practice, the government severely restricted religious activity, except for some officially recognized groups that it tightly supervised. Genuine religious freedom did not exist. Government practices continued to interfere with individuals’ ability to choose and to manifest their religious beliefs. The government continued to repress the religious activities of unauthorized religious groups. Reports by refugees, defectors, missionaries, and nongovernment organizations (NGOs) indicated that religious persons who engaged in proselytizing and those who were in contact with foreigners or missionaries were arrested and subjected to extremely harsh penalties, including execution. South Korean media reported that North Koreans were executed for religious activities. Due to the country’s inaccessibility and lack of timely information, arrests and punishments remained difficult to verify. The government allowed foreigners to attend government-sponsored religious services.There were no reports av…
Report of the Special Rapporteur on DPRK Human Rights 
Date : June 23, 2014
Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Marzuki DarusmanThe Special Rapporteur shares his initial thoughts about the direction he intends to take in fulfilling his mandate, building on the findings and recommendations of the commission of inquiry on human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. He stresses the international law implications of the commission’s findings and the responsibility of the international community to protect.The Special Rapporteur also highlights the responses by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, including some opportunities for engagement presented by the Government’s latest position on the recommendations made at the universal periodic review. He also discusses the qualitative differences in responses required of the Member States, neighbouring States and other States concerned, and the United Nations system, involving also the realignment and strengthening of civil society work and people-to-people contacts.
The report of HRNK, Illicit 
Date : May 27, 2014
The report of HRNK, Illicit: North Korea's Evolving Operations to Earn Hard CurrencyIn Illicit: North Korea’s Evolving Operations to Earn Hard Curre­­ncy, Sheena Chestnut Greitens provides a detailed and thoroughly researched account of the role of illicit activities in the North Korean economy. A central conclusion of Chestnut Greitens’ analysis is that in the context of eroding state control over the licit aspects of the economy, illicit activities are also being “privatized” by North Korea’s elite.  Sheena Chestnut GreitensApr 15, 2014
Universal Periodic Review Second Cycle - DPRK 
Date : May 20, 2014
Universal Periodic Review Second Cycle - Democratic People’s Republic of Universal Periodic Review Second Cycle - Democratic People’s Republic of KoreaKorea
UK Conservative Party Human Rights Commission Release a Report 
Date : May 20, 2014
BRING NORTH KOREA TO INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT, SAY CONSERVATIVE PARTY HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION13 May 2014The Conservative Party Human Rights Commission today released a report calling on the British Government to lead a campaign to bring North Korea to the International Criminal Court for crimes against humanity.The report, Unspeakable and Unparalleled: North Korea’s Crimes Against Humanity, draws on evidence provided to the Conservative Party Human Rights Commission in three public hearings chaired by Fiona Bruce MP, and addresses the human rights violations perpetrated by the regime in North Korea, the refugee crisis, steps to break the regime’s “information blockade”, and ending impunity. It follows the UN Commission of Inquiry report, published in February, and the Human Rights Council’s resolution on North Korea in March.Released ahead of a debate in Westminster Hall this afternoon on human rights in North Korea tabled by Andrew Selous MP, the report contains 13 recommendations, including that the BBC World Service should “establish a radio broadcast to the Korean Peninsula” and the United Kingdom should “increase pressure on China to end its policies of forcib…
 
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